Jointcolors_crop2Welcome to Antioch’s Veteran Services

We are an approved university for the education and training of Veterans and Veterans family members. Our Veteran Services department helps those who are eligible through the process of applying for GI benefits, financial aid and enrollment.

In addition, we offer referrals to:

  • Admissions counseling
  • Employment resources
  • Housing resources
  • Mental health and family counseling
  • Disability services
  • Peer support

Our VetCorps navigator is located in the VetCenter on the first floor near the building entrance. She is available by phone, email or drop-in hours. You can also access help through our Student Life department located on the second floor. Feel free to call or stop by if you would like more information.

Watch a short video about our veteran’s services
Click Here for our veteran’s services informational brochure (PDF)

Crystal Mazac, VetCorps Navigator
206-268-4232
cmazac@antioch.edu

Student Life Office
206-268-4025
Studentlife.aus@antioch.edu

 

Vet Financial Aid Resources

http://www.antiochseattle.edu/financial-aid-2/veterans-benefits/

Apply for your GI bill and other benefits
http://gibill.va.gov/apply-for-benefits/application/

Apply for Financial Aid through FAFSA
http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/

 

Employment Resources

VA for Vets
http://www.va.gov/jobs/

Hero’s to Hired Job Search
https://h2h.jobs/

WorkSource
https://fortress.wa.gov/esd/worksource/

Veterans Job Bank/National Resource directory
https://www.nrd.gov/

Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment
http://www.vba.va.gov/bln/vre/index.htm

Hire Americas Heros
http://hireamericasheroes.org/

WDVA Job Opportunities
http://www.dva.wa.gov/wdva_jobs.html

Port of Seattle Jobs
http://www.portseattle.org/Jobs/Students-and-Veterans/Pages/Veterans.aspx

Veteran Careers
http://www.military.com/veteran-jobs

Boots to Shoes, free Veteran mentoring and job help
http://www.bootstoshoes.org/

Goodwill Operations
http://tacomagoodwill.org/services/military-veterans/

 

Counseling Resources

PTSD Counselors in Washington
http://www.dva.wa.gov/PDF%20files/PTSD%20Program%20Counselors.pdf

WDVA PTSD Program
http://www.dva.wa.gov/ptsd_counseling.html

Readjustment Counseling
http://www.vetcenter.va.gov/Vet_Center_Services.asp

Bereavement Counseling
http://www.vetcenter.va.gov/Bereavement_Counseling.asp

Military Sexual Trauma Counseling
http://www.womenshealth.va.gov/

Antioch Community Counseling and Psychology Clinic
http://www.antiochseattle.edu/student-campus-resources/campus-resources/mental-health-counseling/community-counseling-and-psychology-clinic/

 

Additional Resources

King County Community Services (housing, jobs)
http://kingcounty.gov/socialservices/veterans.aspx

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Treatment Centers
http://www.recovery.org/topics/ptsd/

 

VetCorps Program Support Specialists:

1 King County Roxanne Clark (360)907-9917 roxannec@dva.wa.gov
2 Veterans Conservation Jeremy Grisham (206)418-8808 hm2grish@yahoo.com
3 Employment Phil Bariquit (425)681-6698 p.bariquit@washingtonvetcorps.net
4 Resource Development Jeff Reyes (360)670-9112 jeff_r_vcc@msn.com
5 Service Dog Coordinator John George (206)898-0117 j.george@washingtonvetcorps.net
6 Incarcerated Veterans Vince Woods (253)507-6857 Vincew2@uw.edu
7 Traumatic Brain Injury Program Timm Lovitt (425)420-8322 timmlovittnyc@msn.com

 

 

 Ten Tips For College Veterans

These tips are courtesy of the National Association of Veterans’ Programs Administrator (NAVPA). These are their ten best suggestions for returning veterans thinking about going to college as reported to U.S. News and World Report.

1. Start by applying. Whether you are a first time college student or a transfer student, you must fill out an application. Go to the school’s website to find the requirement and deadlines. Provide transcripts and test scores as needed and your DD-214 for credits you might have earned while in the service. Take a tour of the campus-either on the web or in person. If you don’t know where you want to go, try the school finder at www.military.com  or the “education” tab on www.gijobs.com to get started.

2. Meet the School Certifying Official. Find the Veterans Office on campus and introduce yourself. You will be asked to provide various documents and complete different forms so your enrollment can be certified to the VA.

3. Get your GI Bill benefits. There are many different programs and a wide variety of education benefits offered by the VA. The Post-9/11 GI Bill (including Transfer of Benefits), Montgomery GI Bill, the Yellow Ribbon Program, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment, to name a few. Additionally, individual states offer varying opportunities to National Guardsmen (some of the benefits come with different levels of eligibility). Whether you are a reservist, in the National Guard, or on active duty, you should check the VA website or discuss our benefits with the school’s certifying official. You can find a wealth of information – as well as the application for benefits – at the GI Bill website.

4. Apply for financial aid. All students can apply for financial aid by filling out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by going to http://www.fafsa.gov. This aid can be for grants, loans, and/or work-study.

5. Apply for scholarships. There are many types of scholarships available based on merit, academics, or athletics, as well as private and general scholarships by area of interest. Some schools offer scholarships specifically for veterans. You just have to look. Check the school’s website and always remember: do not pay for any scholarship application.

6. Find a place to live. The key to being placed in housing is making sure you indicate you are a veteran on all forms. By doing so, you may be able to select a roommate from the beginning. Otherwise you might be assigned a room with traditional students (just out of high school), which can be awkward with your recent military experience. Many colleges have housing set aside for veterans; make use of it.

7. Get an advisor. Every student is assigned to an advisor. Some schools have advisors specifically for veterans; smaller schools may not, but curriculum is standard for majors at each school. Interaction with the advisor will assist you in developing a suitable educational plan, making your course selections, and determining your major. This person will get to know you and empower you in decision-making skills in education, career, and life choices.

8. Take the CLEP. The College Level Examination Program is a series of exams you can take to test your college-level knowledge on what you have learned through on-the-job training, professional development, etc. There is a wide range of exams both general and subjective, with up to six credits each. The cost of a CLEP is fractional compared to the cost of tuition and fees. It could assist in skipping general introductory courses, general education classes, or could even demonstrate your ability in a foreign language.

9. Connect with other veterans on campus. Veterans Centers are popping up on many campuses. They are the place to meet other veterans, to do peer-to-peer networking, to connect student veterans with resources, and to help you to get involved-or simply hang out. If there is no center on campus, start one. Student Veterans of America can assist you in forming a chapter at your school.

10. Get career training and develop skills. Career services and job placement are available for you while getting your education. Resume writing and mock interviews are offered. You can be placed in an internship or co-op program related to your career goal and earn college credits as well as a stipend or small paycheck.