Doctorate of Psychology in Clinical Psychology

Unique Offering/Advantages

  • Eligibility to seek licensure upon graduation
  • After completing the first year Residency, defined as a minimum of nine (9) credits per a quarter for three (3) consecutive quarters, you may pursue the program full or part-time
  • Our curriculum promotes values of ethical practice, cultural diversity, and social responsibility, integrated with a Social Justice Practicum
  • Every student may choose two concentrations:
    • First, choose either “Adult Psychotherapy” or “Child Clinical Psychology” as your “Basic” clinical concentration
    • Second, choose an elective concentration in either Health Psychology, Forensics, Neuropsychology, or another basic concentration
  • Each student completes a doctoral dissertation
  • Opportunity to engage with faculty in research, publication, and other scholarly activities
  • Opportunity to engage in the nations’ only “Institute of War Stress Injuries and Social Justice
  • On-site Community Counseling Clinic for supervised training
  • Opportunities to present at state, regional and national conferences

General Requirements For Admission

  • Writing Standards: Students in the PsyD program are expected to be able to write in a scholarly manner that meets American Psychological Association (APA) style and composition standards.
  • Basic Skills Competency: Students in the PsyD program are expected to have a basic level of competency in writing, operating computers, and using the Internet. 
  • Computer Competency: Students are to own their own computers and possess general computer skills (keyboarding, word processing, use of research databases).

Note Program requirements and course offerings are subject to change.

Length of Program

The PsyD program is designed to be completed in five (5) years, including a full-time internship year. Students must finish the PsyD program within a maximum of eight (8) years for coursework, including the doctoral dissertation and two years for internship, for a total of ten (10) years.

Tuition & Fees

  • Tuition: $790 per credit
  • Required fees: $145 per quarter
  • $7,255 tuition and required fees per quarter, full time (9 credits)
  • $29,020 typical annual tuition and fees

Annual tuition and fees based on 2013-14 rates for four quarters. Antioch University Seattle students typically attend classes all year.

Career Opportunities

Antioch University Seattle PsyD Program in clinical psychology prepares students for professional and competitive careers in psychology.

  • Post-doctoral residency
  • Independent private practice
  • Academic positions in a university, college, and other educational institutions
  • Professional positions in school systems
  • Business and industrial psychologists
  • Government agencies
  • Community mental health counseling centers
  • Hospital and medical centers
  • Assessment agencies
  • Forensic Specialists
  • Advanced Researchers
  • Program Administrators
  • Consultants
  • Authors

Welcome!

The PsyD Psychology program at Antioch University Seattle was founded in 2004, and offers doctoral education and training in clinical psychology to prepare students for the practice of professional psychology. The PsyD program is an essential component of the School of Applied Psychology, Counseling, and Family Therapy (SAPCFT) at Antioch University Seattle (AUS) and is an integral part of the mission of AUS. The program is represented in the institution’s operating budget independently of other programs but is located within the budget of the SAPCFT.

Accreditation/Licensure

Antioch University Seattle is accredited by the Commission on Institutions of Higher Education of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. Antioch University Seattle is also committed to seeking APA-accreditation for the PsyD program. The PsyD program at Antioch University Seattle was founded in 2004, and offers doctoral education and training in clinical psychology to prepare students for competent entry into the practice of professional psychology. The Doctor of Psychology program meets Washington’s state licensure requirements for clinical psychology.

Mission Statement

The Mission Statement of the AUS PsyD program fits harmoniously within the missions of the School of Applied Psychology, AUS, and Antioch University: The PsyD program at Antioch University Seattle prepares students for the practice of professional psychology through doctoral education and training. The PsyD program aims to educate students as professionals in clinical psychology and as scholars in psychology in order to promote health, education, social justice, and human welfare. Our curricula shall advance students in the broadest and most liberal manner, including conducting research in psychology. We seek to promote the highest standards of ethics, conduct, education, and achievement in a manner that balances traditional and contemporary perspectives in order for students to become responsible change agents in our complex world.

Program Overview

Antioch University Seattle’s PsyD program is a 150 credit doctoral degree program that is organized into an 11-week quarter system. The PsyD program incorporates a competency-based system to measure student  achievement of our program’s goals and objectives. Competencies are woven into all aspects of student assessment. The core competencies reflect psychologists’ multiple roles and Antioch’s broader mission by including Advocacy for social change. Each of the core competencies has levels called “benchmarks” that reflect developmental steps to achieve the competency. Students post their competent performances as evidence of achievement in their Electronic Portfolios to be reviewed annually by their faculty advisors. The competency/portfolio approach also allows Psy.D. faculty to assess how well the program curriculum and other requirements serve our mission, goals, and objectives.

Competency-Based Assessment

Ten core competencies have been currently identified, each with six (6) “benchmarks” or developmental levels deemed necessary to achieve competency for the effective and ethical clinical treatment of clients. These competencies are derived from and informed by a combination of sources, including the mission of the AUS PsyD program, SAPCFT, and Antioch University; the National Council of Schools and Programs of Professional Psychology (NCSPP; Kenkel and Peterson, 2010); educational and experiential requirements for licensure of clinical psychologists in Washington State; and the 2007 American Psychological Association (APA) Assessment of Competency Benchmarks Workgroup. Students’ progress toward meeting these competencies is tracked and documented through an evidence-based electronic-portfolio system.

Future Multiple Roles

In addition to providing psychotherapeutic interventions and assessment services for individuals and groups, many of our graduates will be involved in supervision, consultation, agency management, organizational planning, program evaluation, and public health activities during their careers. For instance, services required during international crises, including trauma care, are roles that our students may assume in the future. Thus, we concur with the NCSPP model: we train our students for the roles they are likely to take on in their communities.

Social Justice and Social Responsibility

Antioch University (AU) has a 158-year history of opening the doors of higher education to those who have been closed out. AU clinical psychology PsyD programs strive to provide high-quality mental health care to those who have been underserved as well. As part of these aspirations, multicultural competency training is a focus across the AUS curriculum; it is found explicitly in the three (3) course series in the first year, research training, courses in psychotherapy theory, and all therapeutic skill training. We do this in order to support our students in becoming engaged and ethical citizens and practitioners. Many of our graduates who responded to our recent Graduate Satisfaction Survey indicated that they are working with under-served populations and are engaged in social justice and advocacy work. Completed dissertations offer another window into our students’ concerns about psychology’s mandate to serve marginalized and underserved populations. For example, recent dissertations from our program include “Psychological States and Behaviors Attributable to Slavery: A Contemporary African-American Case” and “Psychotherapists Working with Homeless Clients: The experience of Stress, Burnout Symptoms and Coping.”

Cultural and Individual Differences and Diversity Training

Dating back to the 19th Century, Antioch University has a rich history of emphasizing the importance of cultural and individual differences, diversity and social justice. Racial and gender equality, intellectual freedom and independent thinking have been integral to Antioch’s core values and vision. The curriculum promotes values of ethical practice, social responsibility and cultural pluralism that is woven into all classes, supervisor evaluations, and other measures of student performance.

Faculty and Staffing Resources 

The PsyD program is staffed by the Dean of the School of Applied Psychology (SAPCFT) and 11 full-time faculty, including the PsyD Program Chair, the PsyD Director of Clinical Training (DCT), and nine (9) other full-time faculty positions. In addition, the PsyD program utilizes one (1) part-time or “Affiliate” (formerly known as “Associate”) faculty, approximately 17 Adjunct teaching faculty; one (1) part-time Administrative Assistant; and one (1)  full-time Program Associate.

PsyD Student Council (formerly Student Government Association)

The mission of the Antioch University Student government is to ensure the rights of students for unencumbered graduate studies.  The PsyD Student Council is an active and essential component in the PsyD program.  Students are highly encouraged to become involved in the Student Council which participates in the governance of the PsyD Program. Student involvement in the Student Council provides an opportunity to advocate for the student body, development of leadership skills, and effect necessary changes for program improvement.

Curriculum

Antioch University Seattle (AUS) PsyD program in clinical psychology offers opportunities for students to develop their clinical, applied research, and assessment skills. There is an emphasis on multicultural competency and social justice is woven into the practical training experiences and placements. Practicum, Pre-internship, and Internship placements may include working in the AUS Community Counseling and Psychology Clinic and/or a variety of community engagements. Supervision and mentoring are provided by qualified professionals including licensed psychologists.

Currently there are opportunities for placement in forensic, clinical child, clinical adult, therapeutic school, neuropsychology assessment, rehabilitation, college counseling centers, community mental health, and health psychology mental health sites. Collaborative relationships with community sites are nurtured to provide ongoing opportunities for dynamic involvement in psychological services provision, applied research, and psychological assessment opportunities. These practical training experiences culminate in the clinical internship, which is a required full-time year or half-time two-year placement for advanced training in a particular setting in professional psychology.  Local clinical internship placements are available.

In addition, AUS participates in the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Center’s (APPIC) internship match program and students are required to apply for accredited internships.

Core Courses

For students who already hold a master’s degree in psychology, counseling or a related mental health field, some of the following “core” or foundational courses may be waived based on a syllabus review:

  • PSYC705: Cognition and Affect (3)
  • PSYC707: Theories: Cognitive-Behavioral (3)
  • PSYC708: Theories: Psychodynamic (3)
  • PSYC709: Theories: Individual Differences Humanistic Psychology (3)
  • PSYC719: Theories: Systems Perspective in Family Therapy (3)
  • PSYC720: Biological Bases of Behavior I:  Clinical Medicine (3)
  • PSYC721: Psychopathology (3)
  • PSYC722: Biological Bases of Behavior II: Psychophysiology (3)
  • PSYC723: Psychopharmacology I (3)
  • PSYC724: Learning Theory (3)
  • PSYC725: Life Span Development I – Child (3)
  • PSYC726: Life Span Development II – Adult (3)
  • PSYC727: History and Systems of Psychology (3)
  • PSYC728: Psychopharmacology II:  Drugs of Abuse (2)
  • PSYC730: Ethics (3)
  • PSYC736: Social Psychology (4)
  • PSYC737: Group Processes and Therapy (3)
  • PSYC745: Advanced Ethics (2)
  • PSYC776: Psychopathology II: Developmental Psychopathology (3)
  • PSYC804: Community Psychology (3)
  • PSYC805: Professional Issues in Career Management (1)
  • PSYC806: Consultation and Supervision (3)
  • PSYC807: Advanced Professional Issues in Career Management (2)
  • WRTG700: Writing Seminar for Psy.D. (1)

Assessment Courses

  • PSYC735: Psychometrics and Lab (5)
  • PSYC711: Assessment:  Intelligence & Practicum (4)
  • PSYC713: Assessment:  Personality & Practicum (4)
  • PSYC717: Assessment:  Integration & Practicum (4)

Note.  Additional assessment related courses offered as electives include:

  • PSYC715: Assessment: Projectives & Practicum (4)
  • See Neuropsychology and Forensic Concentrations

Research Courses

  • PSYC810: Dissertation Seminar I (3)
  • PSYC820: Dissertation Seminar II (3)
  • PSYC830: Dissertation Seminar III (3)
  • PSYC840: Dissertation Seminar IV (3)
  • PSYC731: Research Ethics, Quantitative Methods & Analysis I (3)
  • PSYC732: Quantitative Methods & Analysis II (3)
  • PSYC733: Qualitative Methods & Analysis I (3)
  • PSYC734: Qualitative Methods & Analysis II (3)

Clinical Training Courses

In concert with our mission, the Psy.D. program admits students with differing status (i.e., master’s or bachelor’s degree). In order to prepare all students at each of these levels, for doctoral-level training, the learning experience is designed to be sequential, cumulative, and of graded complexity.  All students, regardless of prior training and full-or part-time status are required to complete a one-year, full-time residency to make sure foundational conceptual and experiential competencies are met.

The Psy.D. program curriculum and training plan is designed to ensure that every student receives a broad and doctoral-level training as “generalists” based on current and evolving trends in the field of clinical psychology. For example, three (3)  first-year courses focus on developing basic clinical skills, professionalization, and multicultural competency while students engage in a social justice practicum:

Students entering with BA degree:

  • PSYC701-A: Cultural Differences in Social Systems and Counseling Skills-I (3)
  • PSYC702-A: Individual Differences in Behavior and Counseling Skills-II (3)
  • PSYC703-A: Issues in Diversity and Counseling Skills-III (3)

Students entering with a MA degree:

  • PSYC701: Cultural Differences in Social Systems and Professionalization-I (3)
  • PSYC702: Individual Differences in Behavior and Professionalism-II (3)
  • PSYC703: Issues in Diversity and Professionalism-III (3)

Basic Clinical Concentration (Second Year)

There are two “basic” clinical concentrations consisting of a three (3) course conceptually-based sequence in either: Adult (Integrative) Psychotherapy or Child Clinical Psychology. The basic clinical concentrations are designed to provide broad theoretical and scientific foundations for the practice of clinical psychology in general that is integrated with the existing and evolving body of knowledge, skills, and competencies of applied psychology.  The basic concentrations provide the same basic clinical training (e.g., diagnostic formulation, treatment planning, evidence-based practice), but one uses examples from child clinical cases and the other from adult cases. The focus on age differences in clinical practice is the main distinction between the two basic clinical concentrations.

Adult Psychotherapy Concentration

  • PSYC780: Adult Diagnostics and Psychotherapy I (3)
  • PSYC782: Adult Psychotherapy II: Interventions (3)
  • PSYC784: Adult Psychotherapy III: Interventions (3)

Child Clinical Psychology Concentration

  • PSYC772: Child & Adolescent Assessment (3)
  • PSYC777: Child & Adolescent Therapy (3)
  • PSYC778: Child & Adolescent Therapy II (3)

Professional Seminars

  • PSYC791: Professional Seminar I (3)
  • PSYC792: Professional Seminar II (3)
  • PSYC793: Professional Seminar III (3)

Elective Concentration (Third Year)

Elective concentrations include three (3) conceptually-based, sequential classes in either Forensic Psychology, Health Psychology, Neuropsychology or the basic concentration not taken in year two (2)  (e.g., Adult Psychotherapy or Child Clinical Psychology). Forensic and Health Psychology are offered on a rotating basis, every other year. Neuropsychology is offered on an annual basis.

Forensic Psychology Concentration

  • PSYC760: Forensic I (3)
  • PSYC762: Forensic II (3)
  • PSYC764: Forensic III (3)

Health Psychology Concentration

  • PSYC750: Health Psychology I (3)
  • PSYC752: Health Psychology II (3)
  • PSYC754: Health Psychology III (3)

Neuropsychology Concentration

  • PSYC802: Neuropsychology (3)
  • PSYC803: Assessment: Neuropsychology (3)
  • PSYC808: ADHD/LD Assessment and Consultation (3)

FAQ

What is the difference between a PsyD and PhD?

There are several differences between a “Doctor of Psychology” (PsyD) and “Doctor of Philosophy” (PhD), besides the letters and degree title.  The PhD degree is the oldest of all doctorate degrees (including Medical Doctor or MD), and has strong historical roots in traditional research-oriented academia.  Therefore, in regards to the training of clinical psychologists, PhD programs have adopted the “scientist-practitioner” model, which places a greater emphasis in the curriculum and dissertation on the “science” or empirical aspects of the practice of clinical psychology.  In most PhD programs, students are required to take a separate course sequence in both statistics and research, and dissertations tend to be more quantitative by design.  In contrast, the PsyD degree is a relatively newer doctorate-level degree, emerging in the 1970’s from discontent over the scientist-practitioner training model, that was criticized as producing better clinical researchers and clinicians.  Consequently, PsyD programs embraced the “practitioner-scholar” training model, that places less emphasis on statistics and quantitative research, and greater focus on clinically-related curriculum and qualitative research and dissertations (e.g., case studies).   Today, in terms of employment opportunities, the only clear advantage of PhD over PsyD, is at traditional University or research-oriented PhD programs.

What is the theoretical orientation of the program?

The PsyD program has not adopted a specific theoretical orientation in terms of emphasizing one psychological school of thought over another (e.g., Psychodynamic vs. Humanistic vs. Cognitive-Behavioral, etc.).  Individual faculty members represent a broad swath of theoretical orientations in terms of their clinical training, scholarship, clinical practice, and teaching interests to include Psychodynamic, Cognitive-Behavioral, Humanistic, Hermeneutics, Integrative/Eclectic, Multicultural, to name just a few.

Do you accept transfers from previous Master Degree programs? And how many credits may I be able to transfer in?

You may transfer up to 24 credits from your Master’s Degree if the faculty find evidence that a graduate course has at least 75% overlap with the doctoral-level course.  For further details, please reference link for details. http://antioch.localplacement.net/academics/psychology/psyd-faq.html

Can I start the PsyD program with only a BA? 

Yes. The PsyD program admits students who enter with only a BA degree. Nearly 50% of students enter with a BA, and the other half enter with a MA degree.

How long will it take me to complete the program of study?

Students must complete all coursework in eight (8) years and complete their coursework and internship by ten (10) years. Length of program stay is determined in large part to your ability to commit to the program in full-time study. Students taking and completing 9-12 credits a quarter, on average, will obviously graduate sooner than those on a slower pace (see chart below). This program can take anywhere from 4 to 6 years depending on the amount of time and effort you can invest.  Avoiding gaps in your program (e.g., Leave of Absence), whenever possible, will help you stay on track.  Learning good time management skills is imperative.  Students who procrastinate, and put off written assignments until at or near due date, will often find themselves overwhelmed, and risk receiving “No Credit” and being placed on Academic Concern, which can result in your having to limit the number of classes you can register for and so on.  So practice good time management.  Read each syllabus carefully and start working on papers early and often.  Carefully and frequently read the PsyD Program Handbook, program email, Year at a glance (YAG), and your Plan of Study to keep abreast of deadlines, pre-requisites, course schedules, etc., and regularly meet with your Faculty Advisor.  At the “doctorate” level, students are expected to be able to manage their time, be resourceful and educate themselves about program expectations, timelines, etc., and be responsible for their actions.  During your first quarter, you, your advisor, and faculty will help you develop a degree plan that will allow you to complete the program at your own pace.

How much time will I need to spend on the PsyD program?

A doctorate degree (e.g., PsyD) is the highest degree in the field and requires full dedication. In terms of time demands, first and foremost, in fulfillment of licensing and accreditation requirements, all students must complete a “residency” that we have defined as at least nine (9) credits for three (3) consecutive quarters during the first year in the program. This is a critical time for new doctoral students, regardless of past academic, clinical, and experiential backgrounds, to become properly acclimated and socialized in your new role as a doctoral-level student. The academic, personal, and interpersonal demands and expectations of “would-be” professional psychologists are fundamentally different than other degree programs. First year course requirements are sequenced by design to establish the requisite foundational knowledge and skill-set that is required as you start your clinical training as a “clinical psychologist” in Fall quarter of your second year.

What if I do not have the time or resources to complete the “residency requirement? 

If for some foreseeable reason(s), you may be unable to complete the residency requirement in the first year than you should seriously consider re-applying to the program until such time that you are able to complete the first year residency. Beyond the residency requirement, the amount of time you spend working on your PsyD degree will depend greatly upon the number of credits you are taking each quarter and the intensity of your clinical placement (e.g., pre-internship, internship). Please expect to spend 3 to 5 times as much time preparing for a class as you spend in the classroom. Reading, critical thinking, and reflecting are essential demands for every class to get the most of your doctoral studies. Bear in mind, that the workload is not evenly distributed throughout the quarter, so the end points of the quarter tend to be very hectic.  To ease the burden considerably, it is vital to learn and practice good time management, read your syllabi carefully, keep track of deadlines, start written work early and often, and avoid procrastinating until assignments are at or near due date.

Time demands of psychological assessments and report writing. Psychological assessment and testing in particular, is the “bread and butter” of clinical psychology, and the only clear corner of the mental health market, that no other mental health practitioners can touch. Specialized training in test construction, administration, and interpretation, and the ability to integrate psychological testing with other standard clinical data (e.g., interview, records, etc.), is what separates clinical psychologist from every other licensed professional. Our capacity to conduct “comprehensive” psychological evaluations is why psychiatrists, social workers, counselors, educators, the courts, social agencies, physicians etc., refer their clients to us, often as the major arbiter of determining a particular referral question such as diagnosis, disability, etc.  Therefore, it is absolutely critical that doctoral students learn as much as they can about psychodiagnostics, assessments, and report writing. To perfect the skill, requires lots of time and practice, no other way around it. Please be aware that all assessment courses come with a practicum lab that requires additional time outside of class to administer, score and interpret the psychological tests.  You will also be writing psychological reports. The first reports may take a long time to write and rewrite (e.g., 5-10 hours), but like learning any new skill, it gets easier and quicker with repetition. Most psychological assessments also involve rigid deadlines, so this is where time management is really important.

Time demands of clinical training in the doctoral program. After the first year, most, students will start seeing clients in the Antioch University Seattle Community Counseling and Psychology Clinic as part of their practicum or pre-internship experience. Keep in mind that this work is done in addition to coursework. You will be expected to be available for at least 5 specific hours a week for clinical work, and another 1-3 hours in individual or group clinical supervision in a given week. The clinical work will include conducting screenings, assessments, testing, and/or therapy. In addition to the 5 hours of clinic availability you will be expected to make time for documentation of your work (e.g., progress notes) and psychological report writing which can be time consuming. In the clinic you will not be expected to be on call 24 hours a day, but you will be expected to see clients even during quarter breaks. Practicum and pre-internship sites may also be in satellite clinics or other locations. Please take into consideration commuting time to get to and from the site.

Time demands of the clinical training requirements. In order to graduate, every doctoral students needs to complete the following: (1) a 300 hour Social Justice Practicum (or 50 hours for students entering the program with a clinical masters’ degree), (2) at least 900 hours of “pre-internship,” and (3) at least 1,500 hours of clinical Internship in one year (if full-time) or two years (if part-time).  In terms of time-demands, students need to dedicate sufficient time at their clinical placements in order to obtain the requisite number of hours required for graduation and licensure and keep in mind that they must complete the internship and graduate in 10 years.

Time demands of the doctoral dissertation. Students should review the PsyD Dissertation Manual (see PsyD Community Site/Resources/Dissertation) as early as possible, in order to get an idea of the basic requirements such as identifying and researching a research question, forming and coordinating with your dissertation committee, and scheduling three two-hour committee meetings.  Students must pass their second dissertation meeting (e.g., committee’s approval of the dissertation proposal) and obtain approval from the AUS Institutional Review Board (IRB, if applicable), before they can request to apply for Internship. If at all possible, the third and final meeting, the “dissertation defense” is best scheduled before you go on internship. On average, the dissertation process likely takes between 500 and 1000 hours. This works out to approximately 2 hours a day for about a year, however, in some cases there will be intense periods of work that cannot be even distributed equally. Many people try to reserve one to two full days a week to work on dissertation during their final year. Some people choose to take longer than one year to complete their dissertation. Most, if not all APPIC-approved internship sites require that applicants have their dissertation proposals and IRB applications “approved” just to be eligible, and some sites may require dissertation completion.

Miscellaneous time demands.  There are many different aspects of doctoral training, each of which require a certain amount of your time including attending meetings, annual reviews, preparation for the clinical oral examination, applying to internships, attending colloquia, workshops, or other types of trainings, completion of at least 40 hours of personal psychotherapy, and so on.

Can I be employed full-time and attend the PsyD program?

In short, “yes.”  There have been and are PsyD students and faculty (when they were doctoral students), that somehow managed to work at or near full-time (e.g., 40 hours), and pursue full-time doctoral studies, and “survived.” It is do-able, particularly if there is some flexibility at the work site. However, if at all possible, it would probably be best for your health and capacity to really immerse yourself into your doctoral training, to avoid trying to both work and pursue doctoral studies full-time, especially during the first-year residency. Part-time employment is probably for the majority of doctoral students, a much more manageable and practical option. The other work and time-related issue to consider, is if you are married, with a life partner, and/or have children, a romantic flame, or particular recreational or hobby interests, etc., (aka “a life”), that the amount of personal time one must invest to become a “doctor” of clinical psychology is substantial (see  FAQ: How much time will I need to spend on the PsyD program?), and makes juggling full-time employment on top of everything else, that much more challenging. Usually something has to give. Again, there are examples of doctoral students and faculty (as students), that somehow managed to complete their doctoral studies, work at or near full-time, and attend to family/social obligations, and somehow everything emerged intact-but attempting to balance that many time-demands comes with risks. To do so successfully, often requires some flexibility of work hours, an extremely understanding and supportive social support network, personal expertise in time management, excellent organizational skills, and good luck.

What about attending the PsyD program part-time? After the first-year residency, students do have the option to drop their attendance in the program down to part-time (e.g., less than 9 credits per quarter). Some students may vary their course load from quarter to quarter, or year to year, depending on what’s going in their lives and where they are at in the program, or the types of time-demands in a given quarter, etc. However, students should maintain their awareness of meeting the clinical training requirements required for applying to internship and ultimately graduation (see FAQ: Time demands of the clinical training requirements), as well as the fact that every doctoral student must complete their internship and graduate within 10-years of starting the program. Students that do not complete their internship and graduate within 10-years are required to be dismissed from the program. A tragic circumstance, given the amount of time, work, and especially financial resources invested in pursuing doctoral studies. Therefore students need to work closely with their Faculty Advisors and their social support networks, to carefully calibrate the pace and amount of time dedicated to completing the program in as timely a manner, as possible.

Are there any paid internship sites? 

It is important to know that most internship placements are not paid positions, unless they are APA or APPIC-approved internship sites. Internship stipends vary, but are usually around $20,000 for one year. Over the past decade, however, there has been a national shortage of APA and APPIC-approved internship sites with a sizable percentage of students from APA-approved programs failing to match or secure one of these coveted sites. Thus competition is keen, and students from non-APA-approved programs should not expect a paid internship.  That said, several AUS Psy.D. students have been accepted at APPIC or other accredited internship placements, and we encourage every student to apply for an APPIC-approved placement. However, realistically, until such time that our program attains APA accreditation, students should plan for an unfunded internship. Part-time internships are usually available, but not as common as full-time internship sites, with even fewer part-time APPIC-approved sites available. Most students attend a full-time internship and do not work, therefore relying primarily on financial aid to sustain them for the year.

How many credits is considered full-time and part-time study?

Full-time is defined as at least 9-credits per quarter and part-time is defined as less than 9-credits per quarter.

What are the benefits of APA-accreditation and what are the disadvantages?

There are many significant benefits or advantages of graduating from an APA-approved program including: (a) communicates you may have received the national standard of course content and clinical training expected of entry-level clinical psychologists, (b) increases your competitiveness in applying to APA or APPIC-approved internship sites, (c) removes potential barriers for employment such as hiring agencies like the U.S. government [e.g., Veteran’s Administration (VA), Department of Defense (DoD), Public Health Service, etc.], academia, hospitals, and other agencies that require APA approved school and/or APPIC/APA approved internship site to be eligible to apply, (d) increases your access to government programs that offer Health Loan Repayment (e.g., VA/DoD), (e) transcripts are readily accepted by all state licensing boards, (f) enhances competitiveness for post-doctoral fellowships, (g) can help with obtaining research grants, (h) is used as one standard for assessing credibility of psychologists in court, (i) gives access to some forms of student aid that are not accessible to schools that are not APA accredited, (j) grants access to apply for the National Registry and Board Certification, American Board of Professional Psychology, (k) easier for training programs to hire and retain qualified faculty, (l) attract high quality students nation-wide and internationally, (m) possibly increase prestige, and (n) some state licensing boards have already made APA-accreditation a requirement for obtaining licensure, a trend that may become a nationalized, and impact future reimbursement and ability to practice, as well as sustainability of a non-APA-accredited program.

Some of the disadvantages of APA accreditation:  (a) You may not be able to explore different paths in the study of psychology that are not accepted by mainstream psychology, (b) significantly less flexibility in curriculum content and student choice in degree planning, (c) intense time demand on program’s and faculty to comply with numerous, changing standards and regulations, data management and reporting, and effort to standardize program to conform, (d) compels uniformity and standardization of training program’s that raises faculty concerns of stifling academic freedom, (e) generates considerable stress for staff, students, and faculty to prepare for APA accreditation application and site visits (aka “it’s more expensive” and therefore cost prohibitive for the less privileged), (f) demands greater financial resources from University and students to support an APA-approved program (e.g., hiring and retaining qualified faculty, administrative resources), (g) loss of some autonomy is inevitable, (h) philosophically at odds with certain personal beliefs and/or theoretical orientations, (i) risk of restricting the diversity of the student body, and perhaps most importantly, (j) increases the likelihood, if not the reality, of perpetuating social injustice, discrimination, and oppression of prospective students, typically those from less-privileged families, denied an opportunity to attend graduate studies and better their lives, and the potential future service to their community, based upon blindly applying rigid or blanket admission standards and policies required to admit only “highly qualified” students arbitrarily defined as a particular undergraduate GPA, GRE score, etc., as well as “screening-out” the seemingly “lesser” qualified, or “undesirable” candidates that occurs when competing across national and international lines.

If you are planning on practicing in a state other than Washington, please contact the health licensing board of that state to inquire about the accreditation requirements of the doctoral degree-granting institution.

What kind of work can you get with a degree from a non-APA-accredited university?

With the exception of certain federal government institutions (e.g., Veteran’s Administration, Department of Defense, etc.), graduates from non-APA accredited programs generally enjoy the same employment opportunities as those from APA-accredited programs. For instance, graduates from the AUS PsyD program are employed in a wide-variety of settings including individual private practice, state and private hospitals, community mental health clinics, teaching at universities including at the graduate and doctoral level, medical or psychiatric groups or incorporations, state prisons, non-profit agencies, authoring books, conducting professional trainings and workshops, providing consultation services, Native American tribal agencies, forensic practice, working with children and adolescents in schools, clinics, and specialty centers to name just a few. Our graduates have been licensed and found employment outside of Washington State, including Oregon, California, Illinois, and New York, as well as outside of the United States such as Canada, Guam, and Japan. By and large, societal demand for mental health services continues to trend upward, particularly, but not limited to working with children and adolescents, substance use disorders, war veterans, rural areas, the elderly, and culturally and socioeconomically disadvantaged populations.

Are there online courses available to AUS students?

The PsyD program currently offers one course online: PSYC724 Learning Theories (3).  APA accreditation requires that the student comes in person to take their final exam for online courses and there are other standards that must be adhered to. The Dissertation Seminar  sequence (PSYC810-840) is a series of hybrid courses that will continue to be offered online along with PSYC724.  At this time, no other online course will be offered.

How much assistance will AUS devote to helping students achieve licensure?

The PsyD program is designed to meets the requirements of the Washington state licensing board. Student will be provided documentation when applying for a license as a psychologist. The Antioch Seattle PsyD students have not experienced any difficulties obtaining their license, provided they have kept good track of their clinical hours and obtained their supervisor’s signature in a timely fashion.

If the student wants to get licensed in another state/country, they are responsible for finding out what the local licensing board expectation are.

If I have a criminal record, can I enter the program? Is there a background check required to gain admission to or one completed during the program? Is there a background check required to work in the AUS clinic? If I have a criminal record, can I work in the field?

Generally speaking, the PsyD program does not discriminate against individuals with a “criminal record,” especially since there is such a wide latitude of potential “criminal” acts that may constitute a “criminal record” including status offenses (e.g., runaway, truancy, underage drinking), misdemeanors (e.g., DUI, drug possession, engaging in oral sex with a consenting adult, etc.) and felonies (e.g., physical assault, rape, murder). There are also moving and parking violations, potential arrest for peaceful civil protesting, or military personnel “convicted” in a courts-marital for refusing to re-deploy to a warzone for the third time, any and all of these acts, can be defined under the term “criminal record.” Therefore not all “criminal acts or records” are equal. For example, life situation, age of commission, extent, nature, intent, and harm of “criminal” acts, time served, likelihood of recidivism, time of last offense, and recent evidence of rehabilitation or healthy adaptation, are all factors that need to be considered. In regards to social justice, it would also be prudent to consider the individual’s life circumstances, and the particular factors as mentioned above, versus a blanket policy of individuals with no criminal records should ever be given a second chance. Neither Antioch, nor any University or College, performs FBI background checks on every student applicant. If a student applicant discloses a criminal record in their application materials or during interview, information must be gathered about the seriousness of the disclosure. There is no hard fast rule. That said, if the PsyD program learns that an applicant has a history of criminal conviction(s) for certain kind of serious felonies (e.g., pedophilia, sexual assault, homicide, etc.), obviously the faculty must also take into consideration a wide-range of factors, including the safety of the students, staff, and faculty, safety of clients, risks to the institution, and so on, therefore individuals, regardless of criminal record or no criminal record, who are deemed unsuitable for doctoral studies will not be admitted.

What does “Practitioner-Scholar” mean?

Our education and training model is that of “Practitioner-Scholar,” which is based on the model developed by the National Council of Schools and Programs of Professional Psychology (NCSPP) and articulated by Kenkel and Peterson (2010). The highlights of the model are:

Local Clinical Scientist Approach.  We train our students in evidence-based practice in psychology (EBPP), defined as “the integration of the best available research with clinical expertise in the context of patient characteristics, culture, and preferences” (APA, 2005). To help students identify “the best available research,” our curriculum includes four research courses designed to teach students the continuum of research designs and data analytic approaches and aspires to help them recognize and think critically about the ways such approaches are applied within mainstream psychology literature.  More specifically, we value learning how to understand clients and their presenting issues within a systems context that includes the social, psychological and political. Among other things, this means being able to consider the complex and nuanced ways in which a client’s and clinician’s background – their family, work, culture, spiritual tradition, and social class contribute to the interpretations and understandings of themselves and the ways in which they live in and interact with the world around them.

Integrative Pedagogy.  Historically AU is well-known for what is known as andragogy (acknowledging the experience adult students bring), integrating theory with practice, drawing from various disciplines, and considering the framework of power and privilege when studying individuals and social institutions. AUS is proud to continue that tradition, and the PsyD program works diligently to apply it to the field of psychology.  For instance, in PSYC701, students begin a three-term Social Justice Practicum as a means to apply counseling skills and theory. In a second example, PSYC727 History and Systems of Psychology course and the psychotherapy theory courses strive to develop a sociohistorical perspective on theory and practice.  We encourage potential applicants to examine our syllabi, which are a good means for illustrating our teaching approach.  Classes rarely rely on the standard multiple-choice midterm and final examinations only, but rather require students to reflect on, critique, and apply what they have learned in written assignments and/or oral presentations.

Competency-Based Assessment. We believe students should be asked to demonstrate the disciplinary content they learn through applying knowledge to practice. By using small, seminar-type classes and assignments that require reflective application of concepts to real cases and problems, instructors are able to assess student performances. Competencies are the framework woven into all classes, supervisor evaluations, annual reviews of student performances, and the Clinical Oral Examination.

Future Multiple Roles.  In addition to providing psychotherapeutic interventions and assessment services for individuals and groups, many of our graduates will be involved in supervision, consultation, agency management, organizational planning, program evaluation, and public health activities during their careers. For instance, services required during international crises, including trauma care, are roles that our students may assume in the future. Thus, we concur with the NCSPP model: we train our students for the roles they are likely to take on in their communities.

Social Justice and Social Responsibility.  Antioch University (AU) has a 158-year history of opening the doors of higher education to those who have been closed out. AU clinical psychology PsyD programs strive to provide high-quality mental health care to those who have been underserved as well. As part of these aspirations, multicultural competency training is a focus across the AUS curriculum; it is found explicitly in the 3-course series in the first year, research training, courses in psychotherapy theory, and all therapeutic skill training.  We do this in order to support our students in becoming engaged and ethical citizens and practitioners. Many of our graduates who responded to our recent Graduate Satisfaction Survey indicated that they are working with under-served populations and are engaged in social justice and advocacy work. Completed dissertations offer another window into our students’ concerns about psychology’s mandate to serve marginalized and underserved populations. For example, recent dissertations from our program include “Psychological States and Behaviors Attributable to Slavery: A Contemporary African-American Case” and “Psychotherapists Working with Homeless Clients: The experience of Stress, Burnout Symptoms and Coping.”

Faculty

Read about adjunct faculty who teach in the School of Applied Psychology, Counseling & Family Therapy.

 

Cheryl R. Azlin

PsyD Clinical Psychology
School of Applied Psychology, Counseling and Family Therapy
Director of Clinical Training, PsyD Program

206-268-4864

Jude Bergkamp

PsyD Clinical Psychology
School of Applied Psychology, Counseling and Family Therapy
Program Co-Chair, PsyD Program

Steven Curtis

PhD
School of Applied Psychology, Counseling and Family Therapy
PsyD Program

206-441-5352

Phillip E. Cushman

LMFT, PhD
School of Applied Psychology, Counseling and Family Therapy
PsyD Program

206-268-4832

Suzanne Engelberg

PhD Clinical Psychology
School of Applied Psychology, Counseling and Family Therapy
PsyD Program

206-268-4810
206-268-4839

Bill Heusler

PsyD, Licensed Psychologist
School of Applied Psychology, Counseling and Family Therapy
PsyD Program

206-441-5352

Jane Harmon Jacobs

PhD in Applied Educational Psychology
School of Applied Psychology, Counseling and Family Therapy
PsyD Program

206-268-4822

Patricia Linn

PhD, Child Development and Psychology
School of Applied Psychology, Counseling and Family Therapy
PsyD Program
Office for Program Evaluation

206-268-4825, Office for Program Evaluation - 206-268-4859

Mark C. Russell

PhD Clinical Psychology, ABPP
School of Applied Psychology, Counseling and Family Therapy
PsyD Program

206-268-4810

Alejandra Suarez

PhD Clinical Psychology
School of Applied Psychology, Counseling and Family Therapy
PsyD Program

206-268-4810

Liang Tien

PsyD
School of Applied Psychology, Counseling and Family Therapy
PsyD Program

 

Mary Wieneke

PhD
School of Applied Psychology, Counseling and Family Therapy
PsyD Program

206-268-4828

Cami Hayes

PsyD, Clinical Psychology, 2009

She remembers in particular the bonds made with faculty and other students and how that created a learning environment conducive for the honest exchange of academic ideas and observations.

Mike Archer

PsyD, Clinical Psychology, 2007

Antioch University Seattle’s first PsyD graduate, he chose the University because of its focus on clinical work rather than research. His work centered on the underdeveloped field of male body issues.

Nicola Mucci

PsyD in Clinical Psychology, current student

As Mucci moved through the program, she noticed Antioch’s growing reputation in the professional community. “When I work with outside organizations or with students from other universities, they often seek out Antioch students for the critical perspective they bring,” she says.

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